How Did Belle La Follette Oppose Racial Segregation
in Washington, D.C., 1913-1914?

Document List

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Abstract

Introduction

Document 1: "Colored Folk of Washington, 5 August 1911

Document 2: "What it Means to be an Insurgent Senator's Wife," November 1911

Document 3: Oswald Garrison Villard to Woodrow Wilson, 21 July 1913

Document 4: Woodrow Wilson to Oswald Garrison Villard, 23 July 1913

Document 5: Thomas Dixon to Woodrow Wilson, 27 July 1913

Document 6: Woodrow Wilson to Thomas Dixon, 29 July 1913

Document 7: Robert N. Wood to Woodrow Wilson, 5 August 1913

Document 8: "The Color Line," 23 August 1913.

Document 9: "The Adverse Point of View on ‘The Color Line,'" 13 September 1913

Document 10: Wesley Livsey Jones to Woodrow Wilson, 29 September 1913

Document 11: William Monroe Trotter's Address to the President, 6 November 1913

Document 12: "Segregation in the Civil Service," 13 December 1913

Document 13: "A Visit to the President," 20 December 1913

Document 14: NAACP to Woodrow Wilson, 6 January 1914.

Document 15: "A Mother's Question," 10 January 1914

Document 16: "Color Line to Date," January 1914

Document 17: "The Color Line: Various Points of View," 28 March 1914

Document 18: "A New Sort of Woman's Page," 13 June 1914

Document 19: Confrontation at the White House, 12 November 1914

Document 20: "President Resents Negro's Criticism," 13 November 1914

Document 21: Editorial in The Nation, 19 November 1914.

Document 22: Editorial in The New Republic, 21 November 1914.

Document 23: "Segregation in the Civil Service," December 1914

Document 24: "Segregation in Washington," July 1926

Image 1: Belle Case La Follette at about the time she was writing columns in her family's magazine to combat federal segregation efforts.

Image 2: Belle Case La Follette on the stump for woman suffrage in Blue Mounds, Wisconsin, 1915.

Image 3: A Progressive Partnership: The La Follettes in 1925, after thirty-four years of marriage.

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