How Did Immigrant Textile Workers Struggle
to Achieve an American Standard of Living?
The 1912 Strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts

Document List

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Abstract

Introduction

     

IN SUPPORT OF THE STRIKERS

Document 1: "Proclamation of the Striking Textile Workers of Lawrence," 1912

Document 2: "Shall Wool and Cotton Kings Rule the Nation?" 1912


     

THE ISSUES FROM TWO POINTS OF VIEW

Document 3: "Letters Between William M. Wood and the Strike Committee," 1912

Document 4: "List of Grievances by Mill," 1912

     

TESTIMONY OF THE STRIKERS

Document 5: "Statement of Miss Josephine Liss," 1912

Document 6: "Statement of Charles Vasiersky," 1912

     

THE CITY'S ETHNIC NEIGHBORHOODS

Document 7: "Composition and Characteristics of the Population for Wards of Cities of 50,000 or More: Lawrence, Mass.," 1910


     

NEWSPAPER ACCOUNTS OF THE STRIKE

Document 8A: "Mill Men Refuse to Meet Strikers," 25 January 1912

Document 8B: "Opinion of Foss's Secretary," 25 January 1912

Document 9: "Real Labor War Now in Lawrence," 30 January 1912

Document 10: "One Striker Killed; Two Leaders Held," 31 January 1912

Document 11: "High Rents Behind Lawrence Strike," 1 February 1912

Document 12A: "150 Strike Waifs Find Homes Here," 2 February 1912

Document 12B: "Police Clubs Keep Lawrence Waifs In," 25 February 1912

Document 13: "Police Say Women Led Lawrence Mobs," 3 March 1912

Document 14A: "Wellesley Aid for I.W.W.," 5 March 1912

Document 14B: "A Strange Alliance," 5 March 1912

Document 15: "Strike Speech Troubles," 7 March 1912

Document 16: Lillian Wald to Felix Adler, 14 March 1912

Document 17: "Vote To Work In Six Mills," 15 March 1912

Document 18: "Mrs. Amos Pinchot's 8 Days in Lawrence," 17 March 1912

     

THE STRIKE DEBATE IN MAGAZINES

Document 19: Walter M. Pratt, "The Lawrence Revolution," March 1912

Document 20: Mary Marcy, "The Battle for Bread at Lawrence," March 1912

Document 21: John Graham Brooks, "The Shadow of Anarchy," February 1912

Document 22: Mary K. O'Sullivan, "The Labor War at Lawrence," April 1912

     

AN ITALIAN-AMERICAN VIEW OF THE STRIKE: II PROLETARIO

Introduction

Document 23: "Chronicle of the Strike," 19 January 1912

Document 24: "The Grand Fight of Lawrence," 2 February 1912

Document 25: "The Exiles from Lawrence to New York," 16 February 1912

Document 26: "The Worst Enemy," 12 March 1912

Document 27: "From the Battlefield," 22 March 1912

     

THE ENDURING LEGACY OF LAWRENCE

Document 28: "Miss Rose Schneiderman, Cap Maker, Replies to New York Senator on Delicacy and Charm of Women," 1912

Document 29: Rose Schneiderman Meeting Flyer, October 1912

Document 30: James Oppenheim, "Bread and Roses," 1929

Document 31: Mary Heaton Vorse, "Lawrence Strike," 1935

Document 32: Vida Scudder Recalls the Lawrence Strike, 1937

Kerri Harney, "Bread and Roses in United States History: The Power of Constructed Memory," Honors Thesis

Jim Zwick, " Bread and Roses: The Lost Histories of a Slogan and a Poem"

     

IMAGES

Image 1: Soldiers Forcing Strikers Back off the Duck Bridge

Image 2: City Firemen Playing Hose on Foot Bridge to Hold Strikers in Check

Image 3: Law and Order in Lawrence

Image 4: Women Strikers Marching in Support of the Strike

Image 5: Massachusetts Militiamen with Fixed Bayonets Surround a Parade of Peaceful Strikers

Image 6: Bayonets Stop a Worker Protest March along a Trolley Line

Image 7: Children Strikers Lead a Huge March Through the City of Lawrence

Image 8: Children of Lawrence Strikers Preparing to Travel to New York City

Image 9: Arturo Giovannitti and Joseph Ettor

Image 10: Strike: Quash the Indictment Against Ettor & Giovannitti

Image 11: Women Strikers, 1912

Image 12: Giovannitti and Ettor Returned to Lawrence after their Acquittal

     

Endnotes

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