How Did Gender and Family Divisions among Shoeworkers
Shape the 1860 New England Strike?

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Abstract

Introduction

Part 1: Mechanization and Centralization

Document 1: "Leather First Stitched in Lynn," 10 November 1903

Document 2: Phillip C. Swett, "History of Shoemaking in Haverhill, Massachusetts," n.d.

Document 3: Letter to the Editor, 19 March 1859

Document 4: Robert Hassall to the Editor, 3 March 1860

Document 5: Martha Osborne Barrett, Diary Entries, July 1855

Document 6: Alonzo P. Draper, "Machine Girls, and Their Compensation," 26 February 1859

Document 7: "Machine Operators," 19 March 1859

Part 2: Women and the New England Shoe Strike of 1860

Document 8: "The Shoemakers' Strike at Lynn," 24 February 1860

Document 9: Statement by an elderly shoebinder at the second meeting of female strikers of Lynn, 29 February 1860

Document 10: "The Lynn Strike Continued," 28 February 1860

Document 11: Howard, "The Bay State Strike," 29 February 1860

Document 12: "The Strike at Lynn," 3 March 1860

Document 13: Howard, "Ye Modern Rebellion," 6 March 1860

Document 14: "Movements of the Strikers," 10 March 1860

Document 15: "The Ladies' Procession at Lynn," 9 March 1860

Document 16: Illustration of Women's Procession, March 1860

Document 17A: "She Carried the Banner," 26 October 1895

Document 17B: "Carried Big Banner in 1860 Strike," 8 March 1913

Document 18A: "Song of the Lady Strikers," 22 March 1860

Document 18B: M.Y., "To the Strikers," 22 March 1860

Endnotes

Bibliography

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