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BIBLIOGRAPHY OF MICROFORM SOURCES USED IN DOCUMENT PROJECTS

Originally Compiled in April 2000 by:
Marian Horan
State University of New York, Binghamton

Updated in April 2005 by:
Aaron Shaughnessy
State University of New York, Binghamton

Updated in July 2007 by:

Corinne Weible

State University of New York, Binghamton

 

       The following is an annotated bibliography of the microform collections employed in the course of developing documentary projects for this website. It is organized alphabetically by the names of the collections and, after a brief description of the microform collection, we indicate the specific documentary projects and the documents which they have employed from the collection. All in all, this bibliography references 32 microfilm collections from which we have drawn 347 documents reprinted on this website. These collections are typically owned by a number of research libraries and are usually accompanied by excellent printed guides. Students may be able to access microform guides and/or particular portions of the collections through interlibrary loan.

  

 

American Association of University Women Archives, 1881-1976. Published by Microfilming Corporation of America, Published from the holdings of the AAUW National Archives in Washington, D.C 158 reels microfilm, 1980. The collection follows the progress and development of the organization from its inception in 1881 to 1976 and includes reports, press releases, correspondence, proposals, convention proceedings, scholarly reports, and other miscellaneous publications, as well as the papers of prominent AAUW member Ida H. Hyde (1867-1947).

How Did State Commissions on the Status of Women Overcome Historic Antagonisms between Equal Rights and Labor Feminists to Create a New Feminist Mainstream, 1963-1973?
       | Document List | Document 3 |

 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions Papers. Published by Primary Source Microfilm, 858 reels microfilm. Filmed from the original collection in the Houghton Library at Harvard University. This set is one of the most popular and heavily used collections of primary source material on foreign life studied by American missionaries, 1824-1919. It is divided into six units: Letters to Domestic Correspondents, 1834-1919 (including letters to missionaries working with the Indians), Letters to Foreign Correspondents, 1834-1919 (148 reels); Letters from Missionaries to Africa, 1834-1919 (75 reels); Missions to Borneo, Siam, Singapore, China, Japan, 1827-1919 (164 reels); Missions to India, Ceylon, Madura, 1812-1919 (114 reels); The Near East, 1817-1919 (219 reels); and Missions on the American Continents and to the Islands of the Pacific, 1811-1919 (138 reels).

How Did the Removal of the Cherokee Nation from Georgia Shape Women's Activism in the North, 1817-1838?
       | Document List | Document 7 | Document 11 | Document 23 | Document 25 | Document 26 | Document 27 |
       | Document 28 | Document 29 | Document 30 | Document 31 | Document 32 | Document 33 | Document 35 |

American Periodical Series II, 1800-1850. Produced by University Microfilms International (UMI) from 1941 through the early 1970s, 1,966 reels 35mm microfilm; microfilm edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. Series II, part of a comprehensive collection of American periodicals published from 1741 through the 1930s, contains records of over 900 periodicals published between 1800 and 1850.

How Did the Removal of the Cherokee Nation from Georgia Shape Women's Activism in the North, 1817-1838?
       | Document List | Document 35 |

  

 

Carrie Chapman Catt Papers, 1848-1950. Published by the Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, c. 1983, 18 reels microfilm. Unpublished papers held at the Library of Congress including items on women's suffrage, world peace, and women's rights. Includes diaries, letters, and other materials collected by or pertaining to Carrie Chapman Catt.

How Did Suffragists Lobby to Obtain Congressional Approval of a Woman Suffrage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, 1917-1920?
        | Document List | Document 3 | Document 7 |

  

Commission on Interracial Cooperation Papers, 1919-1944. Originally published by University Microfilms International, 1984, 55 reels microfilm. Microfilm available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. This collection is divided into seven separate subject areas and includes correspondence, minutes of meetings, pamphlets, reports, and educational material. In 1944 the Commission on Interracial Cooperation became the Southern Regional Council.

How Did Black and White Southern Women Campaign to End Lynching, 1890-1942?
       | Document List | Document 6 | Document 7 | Document 10 | Document 11 |

  

Gerritsen Collection of Women's History, 1543-1945. Originally published by the Microfilming Corporation of America, 1980, 12,895 sheets microfiche, 238 reels microfilm. Online and microfilm editions available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. More than 4,400 monographs and pamphlets are available on the microform version of this collection, and more than 2,300 English-language monographs and pamphlets will shortly be available in the online version. The microform edition includes significant runs of some 265 periodicals, with the greatest concentration in the period 1860-1900.

Why Did Some Men Support the Women's Rights Movement in the 1850s, and How Did Their Ideas Compare to those of Women in the Movement?
        | Document List | Document 3 | Document 5 | Document 6 | Document 9 | Document 10 | Document 17 | Document 18 |

How Did Black and White Southern Women Campaign to End Lynching, 1890-1942?
        | Document List | Document 2 | Document 18 | Document 19 |

Were Women in the Oneida Community Liberated or Oppressed by Bible Communism, 1848-1880?
       | Document List | Document 27 |

Who Won the Debate over the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1920s?
       | Document List | Document 2 | Document 3 | Document 4 | Document 5 | Document 6 | Document 7 | Document 8 |
       | Document 9 | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 12 | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 15 |

How Did the Removal of the Cherokee Nation from Georgia Shape Women's Activism in the North, 1817-1838?
       | Document List | Document 33 |

 
Greenwich House Papers, 1846-1946. Filmed by the Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University. The collection consists of 99.5 linear feet and includes minutes, reports, correspondence, publicity material, program files, financial documents, publications, scrapbooks and 36,000 index cards.

 

How Did Settlement Workers at Greenwich House Promote the Arts as Integral to Shared Social Life?
       | Document List | Document 1 | Document 2 | Document 3A | Document 3B | Document 3C | Document 3D | Document 4|

       | Document 5A | Document 5B | Document 6A | Document 6B | Document 6C | Document 6D | Document 6E | Document 7 |

       | Document 8 | Document 9A | Document 9B | Document 9C | Document 9D | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 12 |

       | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 15 | Document 17 | Document 18A | Document 18B | Document 19A | Document 19B

       | | Document 20 | Document 21 | Document 22 | Document 23 | Document 24 | Document 25 | Document 26 | Document 27 |

       | Document 28 | Document 29A | Document 29B | Document 30 | Document 31A | Document 31B |

 

Herstory: Women's History Collection, Microfilm Collection. Published by the Women's History Research Center Library, 1974, 90 reels. This collection provides publications related to the women’s rights movement, and was compiled from the holdings of the International Women's History Research Centre. It includes 821 publications by various civic, professional, religious, political and peace groups, the bulk of which were published between 1968-1974. The original collection, Herstory I, includes 317 publications from 1956 through September 1971; Supplementary Sets I and II add additional titles to this period and provide updates through June 1974.

How Did Catholic Women Participate in the Rebirth of American Feminism?
       | Document List | Document 9 |

 

History of Women. Published by Research Publications, 1975-1976, 995 reels microfilm. A comprehensive microfilm collection made from archives of the Sophia Smith Collection, the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College (now a part of Harvard University), and others (including the Miriam Y. Holden private collection on medieval and Western European women). This collection consists predominantly of nineteenth-century books, pamphlets, periodicals, manuscripts, and photographs. Also included in the collection are resources from other libraries on the settlement house movement, social reform in the late nineteenth century, the role of women in the settling of the American West, and Medieval and European women.

How Did Gender and Class Shape the Age of Consent Campaign Within the Social Purity Movement, 1886-1914?
       | Document List | Document 17 |

Why Did Congressional Lobbying Efforts Fail to Eliminate Contraception from Obscenity Laws, 1916-1937?
       | Document List | Document 2 | Document 5 | Document 11 |

What were the Origins of International Women's Day, 1886-1920?
       | Document List | Document 4 |

How Did Immigrant Textile Workers Struggle to Achieve an American Standard of Living? The 1912 Strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts
       | Document List | Document 28 |

How Did Women Activists Promote Peace in Their 1915 Tour of Warring European Capitals?
       | Document List | Document 1 | Document 17 |

From Wollstonecraft to Mill: What British and European Ideas and Social Movements Influenced the Emergence of Feminism in the Atlantic World, 1792-1869?
       | Document List | Document 8 | Document 14 |

How Did Kate Richards O'Hare's Conviction and Incarceration for Sedition during World War I Change Her Activism?
       | Document List | Document 8A | Document 8B | Document 8C | Document 8D | Document 8E | Document 8F |
       | Document 8G | Document 8H | Document 8I |

  

Jane Addams Papers, 1860-1960. Edited by Mary Lynn Bryan McCree and published by University Microfilms International, 1984, 82 reels microfilm. Microfilm edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. The more than 120,000 pages of documents in this collection include correspondence from people such as Theodore Roosevelt and Emily Greene Balch, personal documents, articles, speeches and statements written by Addams, Hull-House Association Records, and a clippings file from the holdings of the Swarthmore College Peace Foundation.

How Did Changes in the Built Environment at Hull-House Reflect the Settlement's Interaction with Its Neighbors, 1889-1912?
       | Document List | Document 4 | Document 8 | Document 16 | Document 18 | Document 19 | Document 20 |
       | Document 23A | Document 23B | Image 50 | | Image 51 |

How Did Cross-Class Alliances Shape the 1910 Chicago Garment Workers Strike?
       | Document List | Document 7 | Document 9 |

How Did Women Activists Promote Peace in Their 1915 Tour of Warring European Capitals?
       | Document List | Document 3 | Document 6 | Document 7 | Document 9 | Document 10 | Document 11 |
       | Document 12 | Document 13 | Document 16 |

How Did Women Peace Activists respond to "Red Scare" Attacks during the 1920s?
       | Document List | Document 8 | Document 9 |

Pacifism vs. Patriotism in Women's Organizations in the 1920s: How Was the Debate Shaped by the Expansion of the American Military?
       | Document List | Document 3 | Document 5 | Document 7 | Document 8 | Document 10 | Document 12 |
       | Document 13 | Document 20 |

Lillian Wald Papers, 1895-1936. Filmed from the original collection at Columbia University, published by New York Public Library Photographic Service, 1976, 112 reels. Microfilm edition available through Primary Source Microfilm from Thompson-Gale.This collection includes correspondence from such notables as Jane Addams, Jacob Riis, and Margaret Sanger.

How Did Immigrant Textile Workers Struggle to Achieve an American Standard of Living? The 1912 Strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts
       | Document List | Document 16 |

Margaret Sanger Papers, 1879-1966. Edited by Esther Katz and originally published by University Publications of America, 1994, 83 reels microfilm. Contains documents from the Sophia Smith Collection and Smith College Archives including source material on birth control and women's rights. Republished in 1996 with additional material from international archives, new documents not previously microfilmed from the Library of Congress collection, and a small amount of re-photographed material from the Smith College Collection.

How Did the Debate between Margaret Sanger and Mary Ware Dennett Shape the Movement to Legalize Birth Control, 1915-1924?
       | Document List | Document 12 | Document 14 | Document 15 | Document 20 | Document 22 | Document 23 |
       | Document 24 |

Why Did Congressional Lobbying Efforts Fail to Eliminate Contraception from Obscenity Laws, 1916-1937?
       | Document List | Document 26 |

What Perspectives Did African American Advocates Bring to the Birth Control Movement and How Did Those Perspectives Shape the History of the Harlem Branch Birth Control Clinic?
       | Document List | Document 1 | Document 2 | Document 3 | Document 4 | Document 5 | Document 6 | Document 7 |

       | Document 8 | Document 9 | Document 10 | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 15 | Document 16 | Document 21 |

       | Document 22 | Document 23 | Document 24 | Document 25 | Document 26 | Document 27 | Document 28A | Document 28 |

       | Document 29 | Document 30 | Document 31 | Document 32A | Document 32B | Document 33 | Document 34 | Document 35 |

       | Document 39 | Document 40 | Document 41 | Document 42 | Document 43 |

 

  

Maud Nathan Papers, 1890-1956. Published by Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, 2 microfilm reels. The collection consists of twelve scrapbooks compiled by the author, including newspaper clippings, correspondence, photographs, and other material.

How Did the First Jewish Women's Movement Draw on Progressive Women's Activism and Jewish Traditions, 1893-1936?
       | Document List | Document 7 | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 17 | Document 18 | Document 20 | Document 21 |

Mary Church Terrell Papers, 1863-1954. Published by the Library of Congress Manuscript Division and Photoduplication Service, 1977, 34 microfilm reels. Consisting of approximately 13,000 items, this collection includes correspondence, diaries, printed material, speeches, an autobiographical manuscript, and other writings.

What Gender Perspectives Shaped the Emergence of the National Association of Colored Women, 1895-1920?
       | Document List | Document 4 | Document 8 | Document 10 | Document 12a | Document 12b | Document 15 |

How Did the National Woman's Party Address the Issue of the Enfranchisement of Black Women, 1919-1924?
       | Document List | Document 1 | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 24 |

  

Papers of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Published by University Publications of America, 1982- . This massive collection, released in 30 separate parts, details the activities of the NAACP from its inception in 1909 to 1972. The collection includes thousands of pages of minutes from board of directors meetings, annual conference records, correspondence of NAACP officials and special reports. Finding guides for each of the separate parts are available through LexisNexis.

How Did Black Women in the NAACP Promote the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill, 1918-1923?
       | Document List | Document 2 | Document 3 | Document 4 | Document 5 | Document 6 | Document 7 |
       | Document 8 | Document 9 | Document 10 | Document 11A | Document 11B | Document 12 | Document 13 |
       | Document 14 | Document 15 | Document 16 | Document 17 | Document 18 | Document 19 | Document 20 |
       | Document 22 | Document 23 |
Image 1 | Image 2 |

How Did the National Woman's Party Address the Issue of the Enfranchisement of Black Women, 1919-1924?
       | Document List | Document 8 | Document 9a |

How Did the March on Washington Movement's Critique of American Democracy in the 1940s Awaken African American Women to the Problem of Jane Crow?
       | Document List | Document 37 |

  

National Woman's Party Papers, 1913-1974. Published by the Microfilming Corporation of America, 1977-1978, 179 reels microfilm. Documents include correspondence, minutes, legal papers, financial records, published materials, photographs, and papers from the World Woman's Party.

How Did the National Woman's Party Address the Issue of the Enfranchisement of Black Women, 1919-1924?
        | Document List | Document 2 | Document 3 | Document 4 | Document 5 | Document 6 | Document 7 |
        | Document 7B | Document 9b | Document 12 | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 15 | Document 18 |
        | Document 19 | Document 20 | Document 21 | Document 22 | Document 23 |

How Did State Commissions on the Status of Women Overcome Historic Antagonisms between Equal Rights and Labor Feminists to Create a New Feminist Mainstream, 1963-1973?
        | Document List | Document 4 |

How and Why Was Feminist Legal Strategy Transformed, 1960-1973?
        | Document List | Document 4 | Document 6 |

 

National Young Women’s Christian Association Records. 383 microfilm reels, 16 mm held at Smith College. The YMCA microfilm collection includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, administrative records, program and conference materials, surveys, clippings, printed material.

How Did the Portland YWCA Enhance the Lives of Women, 1901-2000?
       | Youth on the Move | Interracial Charter | Aid to Women | How Did the YWCA of Portland Respond to the Social Challenges |
       |
World War II | Building Buildings: Mid-Century Growth |

 

New Deal Agencies and Black America in the 1930's. Edited by John B. Kirby. Published by University Publications of America, 1984, 25 reels. Microfilm edition filmed from originals at the National Archives available from Lexis-Nexis.This microfilm collection includes items from many federal agencies and departments in the Roosevelt administration responsible for shaping the relationship between black Americans and New Deal policies.

How Did Black and White Southern Women Campaign to End Lynching, 1890-1942?
       | Document List | Document 1 |

 New York City Municipal Archives: Mayors, 1849- present. Transfer of New York City’s mayoral records to microfilm is currently in progress by the NYC Department of Records. As of 2007, completed areas include the subject files, departmental records, and general correspondence of Mayors LaGuardia, O'Dwyer, Impellitteri, Wagner, Lindsay, and Koch, the newspaper clipping scrapbooks of the Hylan, LaGuardia, O'Dwyer, Impellitteri, Wagner, Beame, and Koch administrations, and mayoral records from 1849 through the 1880s.

How Did Suburban Development and Domesticity Shape Women's Activism in Queens, New York, 1945-1968?
       | Document List | Document 3A | Document 3B | | Document 3C | Document 3D | Document 4 | Document 8A | Document 8B |

Oneida Community: Books, Pamphlets and Serials,1834-1972. Edited by Jack T. Ericson and originally published by the Microfilming Corporation of America, 1973, 15 reels microfilm. Microfilm edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. This microfilm collection provides information on the philosophies, beliefs, and practices of the Oneida Community and its founder John Humphrey Noyes. The collection features 60 books and pamphlets, including works by Noyes on American socialism and male continence, a complete set of the Oneida Community's publications from 1849 to 1868, and a serials section containing other publications with which Noyes was involved, including The Perfectionist and the Witness.

Bible Communism and Women of the Oneida Community, 1848-1879
       | Document List | Document 4 | Document 5 | Document 7 | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 12 |
       | Document 13 | Document 16 | Document 17 | Document 20 | Document 22 |

  

Pamphlets in American History. Originally published by the Microfilming Corporation of America, 1978, 18,589 sheets microfiche. Microfiche edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. This collection includes 646 titles on women on 722 microfiche. The majority of materials on women are grouped in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and deal with issues such as women in the workplace, women's suffrage, and the continuing struggle for equal rights after the vote was obtained.

Why Did Some Men Support the Women's Rights Movement in the 1850s, and How Did Their Ideas Compare to those of Women in the Movement?
       | Document List | Document 12 |

  

Papers of the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching, 1930-1942. Published by Bell & Howell Information and Learning, 1983, 8 reels microfilm. Microfilm edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. The papers include correspondence, reports, pamphlets, legislative materials, and meeting minutes that trace the organization's fight to end the lynching of African Americans.

How Did Black and White Southern Women Campaign to End Lynching, 1890-1942?
       | Document List | Document 8 | Document 12 | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 15 | Document 16 |
       | Document 17 |

  

Papers of the Women's Trade Union League and its Principal Leaders. Edited by Edward T. James, Robin Miller Jacoby, and Nancy Schrom Dye, published by Research Publications for the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College, 1981, 131 reels microfilm. This collection consists of correspondence, reports and printed material of the National and New York, Chicago, and Boston chapters of the Women's Trade Union League. The collection also includes the personal papers of Margaret Dreier Robins, Mary Anderson, Leonora O'Reilly, Rose Schneiderman, Agnes Nestor, and Mary Kenney O'Sullivan's autobiography.

How Did Changes in the Built Environment at Hull-House Reflect the Settlement's Interaction with Its Neighbors, 1889-1912?
       | Document List | Document 14 |

How Did the Perceived Threat of Socialism Shape the Relationship between Workers and their Allies in the New York City Shirtwaist Strike, 1909-1910?
       | Document List | Document 6 | Document 15 |

How Did Immigrant Textile Workers Struggle to Achieve an American Standard of Living? The 1912 Strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts.
       | Document List | Document 29 |

  

Periodicals on Women and Women's Rights, c.1850-c.1950. Published by the University Publications of America, Frederick, Maryland, 27 reels microfilm and 115 microfiche cards. Diverse collection of 24 titles dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1930s. Includes feminist titles such as Susan B. Anthony's The Revolution, labor movement titles such as Woman Worker and Ladies' Garment Worker, politically moderate titles such as Club Woman, and conservative titles such as The Woman Patriot.

What were the Origins of International Women's Day, 1886-1920?
       | Document List | Document 5 | Document 10 | Document 12 | Document 14 |

Who Won the Debate over the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1920s?
       | Document List | Document 26 | Document 27 | Document 28 | Document 29 | Document 30 | Document 31 |
       | Document 32 | Document 33 |

  

Records of the Children's Bureau, 1912-1969. Chadwyck-Healey, 1988, 294 reels. Microfilm edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. This extensive collection includes correspondence, research reports, radio scripts, brochures, bills and laws, court hearings and speeches.

How Did Women Antifeminists Shape and Limit the Social Reform Movements of the 1920s?
       | Document List | Document 11 |

 

Records of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs, 1895-1992. Edited by Lillian Serece Williams and Randolph Boehm and published by the University Publications of America, 1993, 41 microfilm reels. Microfilm includes 21,362 items reproducing minutes of national conventions, publications, president's office correspondence and office files.

What Gender Perspectives Shaped the Emergence of the National Association of Colored Women, 1895-1920?
       | Document List | Document 6 | Document 9 | Document 11 | Document 12A | Document 16 | Document 18 |
       | Document 19 | Document 21 |

  

Records of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1850-1960. Published by the Library of Congress, 1981, 73 reels microfilm. Collection contains approximately 26,700 items from the Library of Congress collections including progress reports from state and local suffrage organizations, biographical information on some of the principal suffrage workers, and a collection of anti-suffrage literature.

How Did Suffragists Lobby to Obtain Congressional Approval of a Woman Suffrage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, 1917-1920?
       | Document List | Document 5 |

  

Records of the Women's Joint Congressional Committee. Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1983, 7 reels. Includes Correspondence, information forms, minutes, reports, financial records, membership lists, and printed matter, 1920-1970.

How Did Women Antifeminists Shape and Limit the Social Reform Movements of the 1920s?
       | Document List | Document 15 |

 

Socialist Party of America Papers, 1897 to 1976. Originally published by the Microfilming Corporation of America, 1975-1977, 180 reels microfilm. Microfilm edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. The collection is divided into six sections: national office papers, Youth and the Young People's Socialist League Papers; state and local files; related organization files and printed materials. An addendum covering the years 1963-1976 forms the sixth section of the collection. Documents included in these sections include correspondence, position papers, memoranda, minutes of meetings, campaign materials, press releases, financial records, pamphlets and broadsides, leaflets, and serials.

What were the Origins of International Women's Day, 1886-1920?
       | Document List | Document 6 |

  

Temperance and Prohibition Papers, 1853-1939. Originally published by Chadwyck-Healey, 1977, 424 reels microfilm from material held chiefly at the W.C.T.U. National Headquarters, Evanston, Illinois, with additional material from Michigan W.C.T.U. chapters. Microfilm edition available through UMIŽ and Chadwyck Healey Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. This important collection of organizational and personal papers includes minutes, financial records, publicity files, correspondence, legal briefs, Congressional Bills and publications illuminating for researchers the political strategies, internal operations and propaganda techniques of the leading temperance and prohibition organizations over eight decades.

Why Did African-American Women Join the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, 1880 to 1900?
       | Document List | Document 2 | Document 5 | Document 6 | Document 7 | Document 8 | Document 9 |
       | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 12 | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 15 | Document 16 |
       | Document 21 | Document 22 | Document 23 | Document 24 | Document 26 | Document 27 | Document 32 |
       | Document 35 | Document 36 | Document 37 | Document 38 |

How Did Gender and Class Shape the Age of Consent Campaign Within the Social Purity Movement, 1886-1914?
       | Document List | Document 4 | Document 7 | Document 8 |

  

The Papers of Edwin Doak Mead & Lucia Ames Mead, 1876-1936. Published by Scholarly Resources, 1991, 11 reels microfilm. Edwin D. Mead (1849-1937) and Lucia Ames Mead (1856-1936) were leading pacifists, writers, and social reformers. Both Meads were involved in the leadership of the international peace movement. Correspondents and others in this collection include Jane Addams, Emily Greene Balch, Alice Stone Blackwell, Carrie Chapman Catt, Hannah Clothier Hull, and Rebecca Shelley. This microfilm collection is part of the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, a research archive devoted to collecting, preserving, and making accessible materials on non-governmental efforts toward peace.

How Did Women Peace Activists respond to "Red Scare" Attacks during the 1920s?
       | Document List | Document 7a | Document 7b | Document 7c | Document 17 |

  

The Papers of Emily Greene Balch, 1875-1861. Edited by Martha P. Shane and published by the Scholarly Resources, 1988, 26 reels microfilm. These papers include biographical information, including material related to her 1946 Nobel peace prize, correspondence to and from prominent contemporaries, and her diaries, journals, notes and other manuscripts. This microfilm collection is part of the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, a research archive devoted to collecting, preserving, and making accessible materials on non-governmental efforts toward peace.

How Did Women Activists Promote Peace in Their 1915 Tour of Warring European Capitals?
       | Document List | Document 4 | Document 5 |

  

The Papers of Hannah Clothier Hull, 1872-1958. Published by Scholarly Resources, 1990, 6 reels microfilm. This set includes correspondence, speeches, articles, notes, biographical materials, clippings and photographs. Hannah Clothier Hull, pacifist and suffrage leader, was one of the founders of the Woman's Peace Party and was affiliated with the American Friends Service Committee and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. This microfilm collection is part of the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, a research archive devoted to collecting, preserving, and making accessible materials on non-governmental efforts toward peace.

Pacifism vs. Patriotism in Women's Organizations in the 1920s: How Was the Debate Shaped by the Expansion of the American Military?
       | Document List | Document 9 |

How Did Women Peace Activists Respond to "Red Scare" Attacks during the 1920s?
       | Document List | Document 6 |

  

The Papers of John and Lugenia Hope, 1888-1947. Published by the Atlanta University Center, Robert W. Woodruff Library, Archives and Special Collections, 21 reels microfilm. Collection includes correspondence, official records, financial records, articles, essays, and speeches covering the years 1898-1945. The entire collection provides insight into such topics as black education, civil rights and social services, politics, religion, social activities and attitudes, economic conditions, and the black press.

What Gender Perspectives Shaped the Emergence of the National Association of Colored Women, 1895-1920?
       | Document List | Document 14 |

  

The Papers of W.E.B. Du Bois, 1868-1963. Published by the Microfilming Corporation of America, 1980, 89 reels microfilm. Microfilm edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. This microfilm edition reproduces the personal correspondence of W.E.B. Du Bois and includes over 100,000 items. The collection contains incoming and outgoing letters, speeches, articles, books and other manuscripts, providing excellent coverage of Du Bois's student days in the 1880s and 1890s, his career as a scholar and educator in the 1890s and 1900s, his period with the NAACP as editor of the The Crisis, 1910-1934, and the last thirty years of his life, 1934 to 1963.

How Did the Views of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois toward Woman Suffrage Change, 1900-1915?
       | Document List | Document 4 |

  

Women's City Club of New York, 1916-1980. Published by University Publications of America, 1989, 24 reels microfilm. These records chronicle women's initiatives and responses to a wide range of local and national issues including protective labor legislation, child and maternal welfare, ethics and government, public education, voter participation, immigration, race relations, and housing, criminal justice, ecology and the arts. The records are comprised of minutes of the Women's City Club board of directors, minutes of standing committee meetings, minutes and reports of annual meetings, the president's annual reports, Women's City Club publications, Quarterly Bulletin (1919-1932) and Agenda (1940-1980), and published special reports.

What Infant and Maternal Health Services Did Middle-Class Clubwomen Provide for Immigrant Women and Children in New York City, 1917-1920?
       | Document List | Document 1 | Document 2 | Document 3 | Document 4 | Document 5 | Document 6 |
       | Document 7 | Document 8 | Document 9 | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 12 |
       | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 15 |

  

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Papers, 1915-1978. Published by the Microfilming Corporation of America, 1983, 115 reels microfilm. Microfilm edition available through UMIŽ Research Collections from ProQuest Information and Learning. Organized into five separate series, this collection reproduces the files of the International Executive Committee, the correspondence of individuals like Jane Addams, Gertrude Baer, and Rosika Schwimmer, documents detailing the scope of WILPF's international activities, a topical file covering issues the League dealt with from 1918 to 1975, and copies of WILPF's official newsletters dating from 1915, as well as publications and press clippings not generated by WILPF but relevant to the League's international activities and concerns. The original records are housed at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

How Did the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Campaign against Chemical Warfare, 1915-1930?
       | Document List | Document 8 | Document 9 | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 12 |
       | Document 13 | Document 14 |

  

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Papers, United States Section, 1919-1959. Edited by Eleanor M. Barr and published by Scholarly Resources, 1988, 97 reels microfilm. This microfilm collection is arranged in three series -- historical records, correspondence, and serial publications -- and reproduces original documents housed at the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, a research archive devoted to collecting, preserving, and making accessible materials on non-governmental efforts toward peace.

How Did the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Campaign against Chemical Warfare, 1915-1930?
       | Document List | Document 15 | Document 16 | Document 17 | Document 18 | Document 19 | Document 20 |
       | Document 21 | Document 22 |

How Did Women Peace Activists respond to "Red Scare" Attacks during the 1920s?
       | Document List | Document 1 | Document 7 | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 12 | Document 13 |
       | Document 14 | Document 16 | Document 19 | Document 20 | Document 21 | Document 22 |

  

Women's Studies Manuscript Collection. Edited by Anne Firor Scott and published by University Publications of America, 1990-1994, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College, 193 reels microfilm. This collection includes material on woman's suffrage, women in national politics, and sexuality and sex education.

How Did the Debate between Margaret Sanger and Mary Ware Dennett Shape the Movement to Legalize Birth Control, 1915-1924?
       | Document List | Document 1 | Document 2 | Document 3 | Document 4 | Document 7 | Document 8 |
       | Document 10 | Document 11 | Document 13 | Document 16 | Document 17 | Document 18 |
       | Document 19 | Document 26 | Document 27 |

Why Did Congressional Lobbying Efforts Fail to Eliminate Contraception from Obscenity Laws, 1916-1937?
       | Document List | Document 1 | Document 3 | Document 8 | Document 9 | Document 10 |
       | Document 12 | Document 13 | Document 14 | Document 15 | Document 16 | Document 18 |
       | Document 19 | Document 20 | Document 21 | Document 28 |

How Did Suffragists Lobby to Obtain Congressional Approval of a Woman Suffrage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, 1917-1920?
       | Document List | Document 2 | Document 4 | Document 6 | Document 8 | Document 9 | Document 10 |
       | Document 11 | Document 12 | Document 13 |

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