| Part A | Document 1 | Document 2 | Document 3 | Document 4 | Document 5 | Document 6 | Document 7 | Document 8 | Part B |

Political Women in the American Revolution

Document 1

The following poem protested British measures, including the Sugar Act (1764) and Townsend Duties (1767):

Since the Men from a Party, on fear of a Frown,
Are kept by a Sugar-Plumb, quietly down.
Supinely asleep, & depriv'd of their Sight
Are strip'd of their Freedom, and rob'd of their Right.
If the Sons (so degenerate) the Blessing despise [hate],
Let the Daughters of Liberty, nobly arise,
And tho' we've no Voice, but a negative here.
The use of the Taxables, let us forebear [boycott],
(Then Merchants import till yr. Stores are all full
May the Buyers be few & yr. Traffick [sales] be dull.)
Stand firmly resolved & bid Grenville to see
That rather than Freedom, we'll part with our Tea

-- Excerpt from Hannah Griffitts,"The Female Patriots," 1768

1. Why were the colonists opposed to the Sugar Act and the Townsend Duties?

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2. What did Hannah Griffitts suggest women do to protest these acts?

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To Document 2

 

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