Why Did African-American Women Join the
Woman's Christian Temperance Union, 1880-1900?

Document List

This document project is available by subscription
through Alexander Street Press.
You may click here to request a free trial.

Abstract

Introduction

               

African-American Women within the WCTU

Document 1: Mrs. Charles Kinney, "Report of Superintendent of Work Among Colored People," 1882

Document 2: Frances E.W. Harper, "Save the Boys," 6 December 1883

Document 3: Frances E.W. Harper, "Work Among Colored People," 1884

Document 4: Frances E.W. Harper, "The Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Colored Woman," 1888

Document 5: Sarah J. Early, "A Word of Exhortation From Tennessee," 16 February 1888

Document 6: Sarah J. Early, "Work Among the Colored People of the Southern States," 1888

Document 7: Two Reports from North Carolina, November 1890

Document 8: M.J. O'Connell, "North Carolina No. 2," December 1891

Document 9: "Color Line Visible," 22 October 1893

Document 10: "Mrs. Harper's Report," November 1894

Document 11: Lucy Thurman, "Work Among Colored People," 1895

               

Recruiting African-American Membership

Document 12: Frances Willard, "The Southern People, August 1881

Document 13: Sallie Chapin, "Our Southern Letter," 26 April 1883

Document 14: Mrs. Chas. Kinney to the Union Signal, February 1883

Document 15: Elizabeth Comstock to Frances Willard, March 1889

Document 16: "Heard Miss Willard: She Addresses Large Crowd at Logan Temple, 22 December 1895

               

A Notable Evangelist and Organizer: Amanda Berry Smith

Document 17: Photograph and Biographical Sketch of Amanda Berry Smith

Image 1: Amanda Smith of Philadelphia

Image 2: Temperance Flyer

Document 18: "Ocean Grove's Anniversary," and "Editorial Notes," 24 July 1875

Document 18B: "The Holiness Meeting," 28 July 1875

Document 18C: "The Women's Temperance Meeting," 28 July 1877

Document 18D: "The Ocean Grove Camp-Meeting," 25 August 1877

Document 19: Amanda Berry Smith, "Letter From Amanda Smith," 1 March 1884

Document 20: Amanda Berry Smith, "Africa," 20 February 1886

Document 21: Frances E. Willard and Amanda Berry Smith, "Amanda Smith, the Colored Pioneer," 20 September 1888

Document 22: Ada M. Bittenbender, "Temperance at the National Capital," 5 February 1891

Document 23: "The First World's Convention," 3 December 1891

Document 24: Amanda Berry Smith, Letter to the Editor, 10 March 1898

               

Lynching Controversy

Document 25: "The Race Problem," 23 October 1890

Document 26: Excerpt from Frances Willard, "Presidential Annual Address," 1893

Document 27: Ida B. Wells, "Mr. Moody and Mrs. Willard," May 1894

Document 28: "The Bitter Cry of Black America," 10 May 1894

Document 29: Lady Henry Somerset, "White and Black in America: An Interview with Miss Willard," 1894

Document 30: Ida B. Wells, "Letter to the Editor," 22 May 1894

Document 31: Frederick Douglass, "Why is the Negro Lynched?" 1894

Document 32: Frances Willard, "The Colored People," 1894

Document 33: "Frances: A Temporizer," 24 November 1894

Document 34: "Miss Wells Lectures," 24 November 1894

Document 35: Letter from Frederick Douglass, et al., 6 February 1895

Document 36: "The W.C.T.U. and the Color Question," 20 March 1895

Document 37: Frances Willard, "The Lynching Question," 1 October 1895

Document 38: "About Southern Lynching," 20 October 1895

Document 39: "They Mourn Miss Willard," [February 1898]

               

Endnotes

Bibliography

Project Credits

Related Links

Teacher's Corner


| Documents Projects and Archives | Teacher's Corner | Scholar's Edition | Full-Text Sources | About Us | Contact Us |